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20121205
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
much held captive by the fact that the uncertainty not only about the fiscal cliff but debt ceiling. >> very quickly, john, we're lose altitude in this market rapidly. what do you make of this, and what are you expecting to close here? >> just shows you how fragile our markets r.one comment out of washington can take profits off the table intraday. we'll hold on to our gains here. >> thanks, everybody. we appreciate it. where exactly do we stand in these fiscal cliff negotiations in the latest now from our john harwood, on your stomping ground. good to see you both. what do you make of this comment from harry redd, john, saying it's unlikely we get a deal by christmas? are they posturing? they don't want to put their spending cuts on the table but want the republicans to. is this posturing? >> i think it's posturing. jay carney gave a white house briefing saying i'm not going to reveal anything about the status of the talks in negotiation beyond the fact that they took place. the support trying to hammer republicans publicly. he's got the high side public opinion on this. traveled t
on the fiscal cliff. certainty that debt reduction, there will be debt reduction, that entitlements will be brought under control. looking for certainty on taxe taxes. until this happens, there isn't going to be that certainly. i have to say that the republicans showed the political will. they stood up, to the conservative base. they put the re-knews on the table. what troubles me -- now that the ball is in the white house court, right? what troubles me is lack of political will on the white house, we haven't seen yet. particularly on spending and entitlement reform. voices in the deckic party saying that this was a mandate to walk away from debt reduction. that is troubling. >> charles lane do you see anything out there to give the business confidence to hire people again? >> well, there is just, i agree with nina. too many unknowns. we could add the situation the slow, steady, stagnation of europe to the mix. we could add uncertainty about where china is going to go. the troubling thing about the departure from the labor force of so many people that is offsetting the increment is
tax. host: how would you compare the current talks to july 2011 and the debt limit, fiscal cliff, sequestration -- guest: the debt limit talks definitely set the stage for this. they were not completely without value. i get the sense it is a lot more serious now. it has almost been like a year- and-a-half long negotiation. with the real deadline being the expiration of the bush tax cuts at the end of this year. to some extent, now they're getting to the real deadline and it is more serious. host: have you written one of the, if we go over the cliff, this is what happens-type article? guest: yes. people would probably start feeling it in their paychecks pretty quickly. never mind what it means to the broader economy. it will hit. it will hurt a lot of people. if we did not change the law and it went one month, two months, three months, it could lead to another recession because there be such a sharp drop in people's incomes and it would be spending less. that would not be good for businesses. i do not think that is quite to happen. -- going to happen. host: caller, last word with
. thank you all for being here. the national debt to the fiscal cliff. what are your thoughts? >> i don't think it matters all that much. i agree with bill clinton's comment from the earlier segment. >> i am agreeing with him as a matter of analysis. it doesn't appear that obama is aiming to do something big and constructive here. he is aiming for a victory on a small point of dispute. that is sort of the lowest common denominator. that is what both sides can agree upon. since obama doesn't seem to want to give anything to the republicans, that is where i think it will end up. lou: where do you think they will end up in a war that we will end up, far more importantly? >> i think that is a great question. i don't think anybody knows. to the point of the testing, i thought the interesting point was made by president obama at the business roundtable. working towards john engler his possession to extend debt ceiling providers. that is what we are talking about. >> what is broken is taxes and the dead and spending cuts. if the president were honest and in good faith, he wouldn't be needing w
. here we go with the fiscal cliff and the debt and now they vote down the disabilities act right in front of bob dole in a real wheelchair. we're just like wow. >> absolutely. if anyone wants to make a music video using this song as the background alluding to all of that stuff you're talking about you know, i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: there you go. >> i can't speak for viacom's lawyers. >> stephanie: no. >> but i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: here's a fun fact. co-wrote ten of the album songs. who is so handsome and rowic and talented. >> thank you. >> don't be a jerk dates from 2009. the joe wilson thing was happening. it just seemed like rudeness and you know, the lack of manners and civil discourses breaking down. you know, my cowriter, andy and i came up with this phrase, how about a song don't be a jerk, it's christmas. it wasn't jerk as you know, stephanie. it begins with a d and ends with a k and ends with flick but -- >> stephanie: yes. >> three years later it is a whole spongebo
fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff type scenario with the debt limit that credited the scenario that led to this, and this idea i voted against that, put bad things to happen at one time because that will force washington to do something. well, surprise, it didn't work. here we are, again, facing this. we have two issues to face. number one is in the immediate term avoid doing damage, and avoid doing harm, and so we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short term. we have to, we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talk about that. it's fundamentally true. spending a trillion dollars a year more than we take in. that's a fact. address it. i approach the issue with a following belief that the only way to get that in order is through rapid economic growth. there's no taxes you can raise to bring this debt down. what the president's proposing does not raise the revenue to make a significant dent on the debt, but it will make a didn't on job creation, particularly middle class job creation, and that's w
that in the summer of 2011, we nearly went over the fiscal cliff by not paying our debts. that caused our bonds to be downgraded because we had an element within the republican conference that was willing to take us to the cliff and hold us hostage. when you look back and see historically that the debt ceiling was raised 17 times, under ronald reagan and eight times under george h. w. bush canada seven times under bill clinton and six times under george w. bush, really it is honoring the full faith and credit of the u.s. government. , iaching that to a debt understand ideologically why people might want to do that, but why would you take the nation to this process? there was a passage of a special select committee. that select committee, if it did not respond with further cuts and tax increases, would seek a so-called sequestration comoe spending domestic and military spending. already in congress we obscene that while the cuts have been made on the military side, some would say there's more to come and on the domestic side and others would argue there's more to come there, the cuts have been s
turn to the rest. >> right now we are facing a fiscal cliff. last year we were facing the debt ceiling. before that, we were looking at several potential government shutdowns. at a different level, the appropriations process has not worked as intended for years. neither has the budget process. it seems like abnormal is the normal. that type of activity in this situation where we are already looking ahead to the next potential showdown, as he suggested, with the next debt ceiling altercation, this creates uncertainty, which is not good for the private sector and certainly is not good for the federal government in terms of its ability to function in a normal way. how can congress break out of this? >> do what we are hired to do and to appropriations in a timely manner. in maryland, we have a lot of defense contractors very concerned about sequester. many of them say, warner, warner, a nuisance and-bowles. -- do simpson-bowles. everyone supports it, but no one has read it. but the top line numbers are almost the same -- next time you do a default, do not make it so awful. putting a gun to
of santa barbara. we have gone over the fiscal cliff here in california. we are billions of dollars in debt. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. if the democratic party is so good, then why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time the unions, instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns give that money back to the membership so they can maybe pay their own wages and tax bears and people like me that live on fixed incomes don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we have worked hard to make? guest: you have worked hard. number one, i cannot comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. reports are that things are starting to turn around a little over there. it's tough to pass a budget if when you have the fiscal majority requirement. second, how we got here, it's not unions. wages for americans have been going down the past 115 years. people are not keeping up with inflation. the average american worker has taken a 2011 pay cut when you compare what they made 10 years ago to what they're making now. -- $200
, not limited to just worrying about the debt and the fiscal cliff and such. our program today, i am welcoming you. stonewall clerk will welcome you as well. and riley will give the polling results, and ron brown will do the interview and then we will have a panel discussion. it will be a terrific day. please turn these babies off. again, welcome. is executive vice president of allstate. joan has been a terrific partner with us over the last four years. she is responsible for all relations for allstate. prior to joining that company, she did similar work with monsanto. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what this town of washington is all about. that you very much, and dwell come our friends here. -- and welcome our friends here. [applause] >> ok, good morning, and thank you so much for that kind introduction. "the atlantic" and "national journal" have been terrific partners in this effort. i thank them very much for that, and many thanks to edward reilly, who will take us through the data today, and also for jeremy, an associate, who was the lead researcher
. but limiting or even charitable deductions could be part of a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. one man of the tax policy center says given our national debt? sort of tax hikes are inevitable. >> one way is to tax the same income we have right now but get more revenue. the alternative is to tax more. get rid of the deductions and the exemptions, the things that reduce or taxable income. we tax more at today's rates and we bring in more revenue. >> reporter: itemized deductions are the first form of tax breaks on the table. used by 30% of tax payers they cost the government over $200 billion a year. about a fifth of this year's deficit. charitable donations alone cost $40 billion a year. but ending them is costly too. >> anybody who gives money away, taxes will go up. they'll pay more. that's what we're all about trying to get rid of these. but at the same time they'll likely give less to charity. if i don't get the deduction, it's going to cost me more after taxes to give away money. >> reporter: and say nonprofit leaders, if the rich stop giving, the poor stop getting. >> we're here to
over the fiscal cliff and then run into the debt limit in february. that would be a puriic victory. >> vus not goiit's just not goi happen. tell me, because you know these numbers better than anybody, other than people sitting in the white house that have looked at the very latest, but it seems like 37%. we're starting to hear that more, and both sides may coalesce around that eventually. let's say we change the rates to 35% and 37% and you eliminate deductions, not the home mortgage because we're not going to get that. we're probably not going to get charitable. can you say $1.2 trillion if that's where we compromise and new revenues. >> capital gains, dividends, estate. >> if you're more aggressive. >> about half theway. >> let's say you aggressively go on capital gains, dif evidends >> you start to get close. >> david ig nanatiuignatius, ar to have a deal? you know washington. >> my guess is we are going to have a deal just because the stars have now been in alignment. i've been struck by the way president obama has taken lead of his own party and himself been the negotiator, pu
. 25 days now until america goes over the fiscal cliff if nothing happens. congress still in a political stalemate. the house of representatives are taking the weekend off. when it comes to solving our debt problems, we know where both parties stand but what about the people who will have to live with the decisions? what do americans, average americans, want to see in a fiscal cliff deal? steve leisman here now with our exclusive results of the cnbc all-america economic survey. what do americans want, steve? >> what you would expect. free stuff, tyler. actually, no, we'll get into that in a second. first we want to show you results of our december cnbc all-america survey. what we asked about the fiscal cliff. the first thing we wanted to establish is do people know about this thing? we looked at some of the other times we've asked this. what we'll see right here is other situations where they knew it, where other main stories that were out there. for example, the trayvon martin shooting. 91% of americans knew about that. occupy wall street, 80%. going forward what you have
up. i hope boehner and obama can find a way to avoid the initial effects of the fiscal cliff. but in february or march you have to raise the debt ceiling. i can tell you this, there is a hardening on the republican side. we're not going to raise the debt ceiling. we're not going to let obama borrow anymore money or any american congress borrow anymore money until with fix this country from becoming greece. that requires significant entitlement reform to save social from bankruptcy and medicare from bankruptcy. social security is going bankrupt in about 20, 25 years. medicare is going bankrupt in 15 or 20 years. the baby boomers are coming in at 10,000 a day. and we just can't scene this. martha: president last week said we'll not play that game. last time around they wouldn't let the debt ceiling go up, i tell you right now, something to this effect we will play that game. >> we will play that game, mr. president. that is not a game. the game you're play something small ball. you're talking about raising rates on top 2% that would run the government for 11 days. you got reele
speaker john boehner who is making an announcement on the fiscal cliff right now. >> his promise to bring a balanced approach is mainly tax hikes. and does not solve our debt crisis, it increases spending. our plan meets these standards, cuts spending and paves the way for real job growth in our country. in the five weeks since we've signaled our willingness to forge an agreement with the president, he's never put forth a plan that meets these standards. and frankly, it's why we don't have an agreement today. the longer the white house slow walks this discussion, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff, and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> good morning. the president has said on a daily basis that we should be passing a balanced plan. but what we hear from the president is continuing only discussion on one side of the ledger. it has always been about tax rate increases, and nothing about spending. and we insist, say, look, mr. president, let's talk about a balanced plan, but where are your specifics on the spending cuts? even his own advisers say that any kind of
:30 eastern. you can see the house live when they return here on c-span. in the meantime while fiscal cliff negotiations continue, we hosted a roundtable discussion about the debt talks and domestic program cuts on this morning's "washington journal." can host: isabel sawhim and james capretta. mr. capretta, let me begin with you. are these sequester cuts devastating? guest: they would be deep cuts. 80% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in the immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world? no. host: what do you mean by that? guest: there would be a downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of domestic accounts. so there would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduce in federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of 5%, 10%. so there would be some downsizing of the services that are provided by the federal government. but the economy would go on and the government would go on and the public would still continue to get by and large serviced. host: can agen
to this debt crisis, the so-called fiscal cliff, could bring about the sequestration that is the slicing of the military right in half. that would be a disaster in many respects. across the world people would see we can't handle our own country well, our own defense well. people across the world would see us failing to fulfill the duty of the constitution to provide for the national defense that's up to congress to do that. but after we get this done -- and let's hope that it does come to pass -- a second challenge is out there, and that's the challenge to glue together a strategy that will keep this country safe and secure. back in the 1947 era george key man sent what's known as the long telegram from moscow to the white house spelling out the rise of the soviet union and its intentions. president truman, my fellow missourian, and his staff glued together the containment strategy which stayed in effect through admiral -- excuse me, through general eisenhower's presidency and later until, as you know, the wall in berlin came tumbling down, and the soviet union imploded on itself. the st
economists. my next guest is concerned that we are going over the fiscal cliff. he says, president obama seemingly is intent on pressing his post-election advantage to win tax increases on the wealthy and to eliminate the houses debt ceiling leveraged. joining us now from washington d.c., peter wallace, former reagan white house counsel, former member of th financial crisis inquiry commission. a senior fellow at the american enterprise institute. good to have you here. you believe they're going over the cliff. >> i think their is a real danger of this. one can see a path for obaa that does not look so terrible if we do go over the cliff. all of the taxes go up, but the democrats have an opportunity to introduce legislation to reduce the taxes for 98 percent of the people leaving the wealthier people, i guess you could call them wealthy, the top two percentage to stay at the high rates. it is possible to do this. lou: it is possible, but i have to ask you, surely te republicans have to undestand and had to understand six months ago what what transpired in this lame duck session of congres
are facing the fiscal cliff. last year we were facing the debt ceiling standoff, before that we were looking at several shutdowns it seems like abnormal and it seems abnormal in this type of situation where we are already looking ahead to the next potential shutdown for the next debt ceiling altercation. this creates uncertainty in a normal way so how can the congress breakout of this. >> it is in a timely manner. you know, obviously like in maryland we have a lot of contractor defense contractors very concerned about sequestering. i love the fact that many of them say warmer, and do simpson-bowles don't do sequester. everybody's smart and everybody's read it. the top line numbers are almost the same, and a memo to congress the next time you devotee fault don't make it so all of that you actually put a gun to your forehead which is kind of what we have done and through the the fault which i hope would be something a little bit going for it. i completely concur with you on the notion that maybe the most ridiculous thing that has taken place in the last couple of years from those who say they
: the president sees the fiscal cliff showdown as an opportunity to break that linkage for good. republicans say they will not increase the debt ceiling now $16 trillion and due to expire in february without more deficit reduction. >> history shows the only major deficit cutting deals we ever do around here, ever, comes after debates over the debt ceiling. it may be a good idea if you don't care about the debt, but it's a non-starter for those of us who do. >> reporter: public opinion generally is on the president's side, but republicans in the house are not paralyzed or perilous, more unified behind speaker boehner than a year ago. why is this important? the white house is beginning to notice and now believe there is a deal boehner can find the stroets pass it. >> an idea what's really at stake. rebecca jarvis has a look how the government spends money and how it could spend less. rebec rebecca, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. >> the question comes up in terms of the money that we're talking about in raising the rate. how much is it that the republicans are objecting to? >> if you look
. how much of our discussion was not on the fiscal cliff, but actually the fact that what is really important here is avoiding the fiscal cliff, but using it as an opportunity to help address these huge fiscal issues. >> the group hamas "campaign to fix the debt," was co-founded by alan simpson and art singles, former coach fares on the fiscal commission for responsibility and reform. >> coming up next, governor's visit the white house, for meetings on the so-called fiscal cliff. and then remarks from congressman paul ryan and senator marco rubio from the kemp foundation awards dinner. >> this week on the c-span networks, hurricane sandy response and housing issues. wednesday, the fema administrator joins the housing secretary before the senate appropriations committee, to testify about hurricane recovery efforts. live coverage at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span 3. on tuesday, he secretary testifies on the federal housing administration and fiscal issues. see that live, starting at 10:00 a.m. eastern, here on c-span. [delaware runyan -- [bell ringing] >> follow harry truman's eldest gr
days to keep the nation from going over the so called "fiscal cliff" >> it appears americans don't mind sharing opinions.. even on things that don't exist. a recent poll by public policy polling found 25- percent of americans took a stance on a phony debt reduction policy called the "panetta-burns plan." the proposal was dreamed up by pollers to test how many people would speak on something they clearly don't know anything about. eight-percent of those polled supported the mythical plan and 17- percent in contrast, 39- percent of voters were willing to share their thoughts about the "simpson- bowles" deficit policy up for debate in >> you don't have to look >> >> nobody wants to get this done more than me. >> >> but key players aren't talking in the same room. congressional aides say they're not even >> the president is ready, willing and able, waiting to be able to sit down and seriously negotiate this but they have to be willing to come to the table with specifics. i think the next 72 hours >> some lawmakers are going back to their districts. congress has little scheduled business f
of the opportunity we have now with the fiscal cliff debate to bring attention to it because i don't think it's getting enough attention. there's no greater threat to america's growth and prosperity than our uncontrolled national debt. currently the country posts -- country's debt exceeds $16 trillion. we face the so-called fiscal cliff that could send our economy into another recession. in these difficult times we're challenged by people we represent to find real solutions, not short-term band-aids. as we move forward, it's clear that we must discuss spending. emphasize that word "spending." i know that president obama is hyperfocussed on increasing taxes as part of his deficit-reduction proposal, and i think the the election shows that he's legitimate in doing that. but he could have really declared victory about three weeks ago and in the three weeks since then spend time talking about the expenditure side of the ledger. because if we're going to be serious about reducing our debt, we must talk about spending. not some time next year, not only after we talk about taxes. we must talk about
have no idea how we're going to pay for them. we have a fiscal cliff which we describe now that everybody's talking about at the end of this year, that's not the cliff. the cliff is the unsustainable debt we have. and unless, in my estimation, a lot of economists, you're not going to put us on a path to prosperity unless you take about $9 trillion out over the next ten years. and we're barely talking $4 trillion. >> yeah, nobody's talking $9 trillion. >> yeah. and $9 trillion is the only thing that actually solves this. so we're sitting here as a country, we have made commitments that have to be rearranged and made more efficient. we have a tax structure that is subpar to what we need for our economy in terms of our historical averages. and nobody's talking long run. everybody's talking december 31st. >> i know. you see john boehner's proposal, he was very critical of the president's proposaproposal, it nonstarter, but boehner comes out talking cutting $2.2 trillion. you talk about $9 trillion needed over the next ten years. look at the past four years. we've almost added $
-- [inaudible] 53% of americans will blame republicans in congress if you go over the fiscal cliff. how long can you have that hard line on those making 250 and above. >> america faces a very serious problem and our goal is to make sure it gets solved. we have a debt problem that is out of control. we have got to cut spending and i believe it is appropriate to put revenues on the table. the receive news we are putting on the table are going to come from, guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes and have the same people pay more -- more of their money to the federal government without raising the tax rates which we believe will harm our economy. [inaudible question] >> i think our members understand the seriousness of the situation that our country faces. trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. $16 trillion of debt on the books. every man, woman and child owing the american government $50,000 and that number is increasing every single year. as a result, our members understand that we've got to solve the problem, and we will. >> the house is going to
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)